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Stephanie Bush
Caldwell Lab

Stephanie Bush

Email: stephalopod@berkeley.edu

Phone: (510) 643-5448

Web page: http://socrates.berkeley.edu/%7Esbush/

Her research: "Two topics make up my current research: (1) Why do deep-sea squid release ink, which is assumed to be a visual defense, in the deep-sea and (2) What other strategies and behaviors are used by deep-sea squid in order to avoid predation in a three-dimensional space with nothing to hide behind?"

On her day-to-day work: "I use Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) to make behavioral observations in the wild, collect animals to study their functional morphology, test interspecific interactions including response to ink release in the lab, and analyze the chemistry of squid ink. Most of my work occurs in a cold, dark room whether that be on a research ship or in a sea-water coldroom onshore or analyzing video footage from ROV dives."

Her favorite thing about her work: "We are always seeing new animals and making new observations. Even as an invertebrate biologist one doesn't recognize some of these organisms for what they are!"

Read Stephanie's research profile: Squid science: Field notes from Stephanie Bush

Publications:

Bush, S.L., B.H. Robison, & R.L. Caldwell. 2009. Behaving in the dark: locomotor, chromatic, postural and bioluminescent behaviors of the deep-sea squid Octopoteuthis deletron Young 1972. Biological Bulletin. 216: 7-22.  Read it


Bush, S.L., B.H. Robison, and R.L. Caldwell. 2009. Behaving in the dark: locomotor, chromatic, postural and bioluimescent behaviors of the deep-sea squid Octopoteuthis deletron Young 1972. Biological Bulletin. 216: 7-22.


Bush, S. L., and B. H. Robison. 2007. Ink utilization by mesopelagic squid. Marine Biology. 152(3):485-494