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Andrew Lee
Padian Lab

Andrew Lee

Email: alee712@berkeley.edu

Phone: (510) 643-2109

Research: Andrew Lee is using biomechanics to investigate the principles governing how animals move and how their patterns of locomotion have changed over time. He is particularly interested in changes in dinosaur locomotion. Early dinosaur lineages were bipedal, whereas many later groups walked on four limbs. How and why did these changes occur over time?

Why UCMP? "I came to Berkeley for several reasons. First, I wanted to work with researchers, like Kevin Padian and Mark Goodwin, who are doing research on questions related to bone microstructure. In addition, the histology facilities in the department of integrative biology and UCMP are excellent, and we have access to specimens that can be sectioned for this kind of investigation."

Why paleontology? "One word: wonderment. Like Stephen J. Gould, my attraction to paleontology began on the fourth floor of the American Museum of Natural History. I was immediately in awe of the strange and diverse animals that no longer exist. That same sense of wonderment has always drawn me to nature and science."

Publications:

Lee, A.H., A.K. Huttenlocker, K. Padian, and H.N. Woodward. 2013. Analysis of growth rates. Chapter 8 (pp. 217-251) In Padian, K. and E.-T. Lamm (eds.), Bone Histology of Fossil Tetrapods: Advancing Methods, Analysis, and Interpretation. University of California Press, Berkeley.


Woodward, H.N., K. Padian, and A.H. Lee. 2013. Skeletochronology. Chapter 7 (pp. 195-215) In Padian, K. and E.-T. Lamm (eds.), Bone Histology of Fossil Tetrapods: Advancing Methods, Analysis, and Interpretation. University of California Press, Berkeley.


Lee, A.H., K. Padian, M.T. Taylor, M.J. Wedel, R.B. Irmis, and S. Werning. 2010. The universal temperature dependence model fails to predict body temperatures of mammals and dinosaurs. Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 2010 Annual Meeting: abstract 98.7.


Bybee, P. J., A. H. Lee, and E.-T. Lamm. 2006. Sizing the Jurassic theropod dinosaur, Allosaurus: assessing growth strategy and evolution of ontogenetic scaling of limbs. Journal of Morphology 267:347-359.


Padian, K., J.R. Horner, and A. Lee. 2006. Sexual dimorphism in dinosaurs?: a review of the evidence. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology 25 (3, suppl.): 98A.