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Barnosky interviewed about climate change

global changeTony Barnosky, UCMP Curator and Professor of Integrative Biology, discussed a consensus statement to world leaders regarding global change, Maintaining Humanity's Life Support Systems in the 21st Century, this past week in an interview by KQED Science Editor Craig Miller.

Barnosky has been working with the California Office of the Governor to promote science-based solutions to global change problems. With 15 other global change scientists he developed the scientific consensus statement, which has now found its way into a number of state, national, and international discussions about environmental solutions. Since the release of the statement in May, more than 1,000 scientists around the world have endorsed it. Join the scientists and add your name as an endorser of the statement.

Engaging the next generation of geoscientists

Most Earth scientists have vivid memories of their first geological field trip, but how many can say their first experience was as a high school student on a trip led by 15 professors, professional scientists, and college students?

Thirty lucky students from the Bay Area, El Paso, and New Orleans were selected to participate in a ten-day, geology-of-California field trip that started along the San Andreas Fault at Pt. Reyes National Seashore and ended at Yosemite National Park. Led by UCMP Assistant Director Lisa White as part of the METALS (Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences) program, the trip was supported by an NSF collaborative grant between San Francisco State University, University of Texas El Paso, and the University of New Orleans. High school students recruited from each of the participating cities came together on June 10-20, 2013, for a fast-paced field trip led by faculty, graduate students, and educators associated with those universities.

At Pt. Reyes visitor center

Lisa White (second from left) with students at the Pt. Reyes National Seashore visitor center.

At Tomales Bay

Students on their way to see exposures of invertebrate fossils along Tomales Bay, east of Inverness ridge.

Lisa said, "Having directed the program for four years, my expectations for the student participants grow higher each year, and I am never disappointed. We create opportunities for the students to not only learn in a field setting but also to compete for awards by demonstrating an understanding of key concepts, making rock and fossil identifications, and producing outstanding field interpretations. The students, many of whom have spent little time outdoors or at the coast or in the mountains, have fun testing their endurance and enjoying learning in a natural setting."

The overriding goal of the METALS program is to raise awareness about the geosciences and to increase the numbers and diversity of students choosing academic paths in geoscience and related careers. What better way to showcase Earth science than through fun and exciting field work?

Snow at Lassen

The students enjoyed the snow they found at Mt. Lassen.

Group photo

The trip participants posed for this group photo at Mt. Lassen. All the photos in this post are courtesy of Lisa White.

Fossil bridging with the Girl Scouts

What Bay Area event brings together 5,000 eager girls, 50 exhibitors and a walk across the Golden Gate Bridge? Girl Scout Bridging! On Saturday, May 11, Lisa White, UCMP Director of Education and Public Programs, and Erica Clites, Museum Scientist, attended the annual Girl Scout event at Crissy Field in the Presidio of San Francisco. The Bridging is a symbolic event recognizing the transition from the Junior level of Girl Scouting to Cadette, and the girls — representing troops throughout the western states — still had plenty of energy to learn about the history of life and engage with fossils following their bridge walk!

At the UCMP table

Lisa White and Erica Clites are ready for those Girl Scouts. Note the Golden Gate Bridge in the background, partially concealed by fog.

Erica and Girl Scouts

Erica shows interested Girl Scouts a mammoth tusk and other fossils found in the Bay Area. Both photos courtesy of Lisa White.

Marshall shows terrestrial mammal extinction due to Red Queen with new work published in Science

By studying 19 groups of Cenozoic mammals Charles Marshall and Tiago Quental tested and confirmed the Red Queen hypothesis. Red Queen is the hypothesis that states that groups must continue to adapt and evolve in response to their environments in order to survive. It's not just extinction events that threaten groups--it's also low rates of origination of new species. The new research (published in Science) shows that these mammal groups have experienced diversity declines in part due to their failure to keep pace with their deteriorating environments.

Read the UC Berkeley News Center story about this work.

Read the Science paper.

Warmer climates can lead to big lizards

A mounted modern lizard alongside the fossil jaw bones.

Pat Holroyd and co-authors describe a new species of giant lizard in the latest issue of Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The fossil jaw bones of this lizard have been in the UCMP collection since the 1970s, but it took a while for them to be recognized as something special. The specimens are from an herbivorous lizard that lived in the warm climate of Asia 40 million years ago. Dubbed Barbaturex morrisoni, this lizard was much bigger than the largest herbivorous lizards alive today. The unique traits of this lizard indicate that a warmer climate may have enabled gigantism via increased floral productivity and metabolic rates.

 

Read the press release at the UC Berkeley Newscenter.

 

Read the full paper at Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Werning blogs at PLOS about the fossils of the Sierra Nevada

In her latest post over at the Public Library of Science blog The Integrative Paleontologists Sarah Werning writes about about what the fossil history of California can teach us about climate change. UCMP is teaming up with other Berkeley natural history museums on the Berkeley Initiative in Global Change Biology to strive for a comprehensive picture of the effects of climate change on past, present, and future life.

Read Sarah's post here.

UCMP students honored with 2013 Paleontological Society Student Grants Awards

Dori Contreras (Looy Lab), Renske Kirchholtes (Looy Lab), and Allison Stegner (Barnosky Lab) will each receive awards from The Paleontological Society to support their research. Each year the Society grants Mid-America Paleontology Society (MAPS) Outstanding Research Awards to the top three student proposals received and honors a student with the G. Arthur Cooper Award for student research.

Dori, Renske, and Allison

Dori Contreras (left), Renske Kirchholtes (center), and Allison Stegner (right) busy at UCMP's Cal Day open house.
 

Dori Contreras will receive a MAPS Outstanding Student Research Award to support her research titled: Investigating the evolution of tropical rainforests: A functional analysis of the late Cretaceous Jose Creek Member, McRae Fm.

Renske Kirchholtes will receive a MAPS Outstanding Student Research Award to support of her research titled: Phytoliths: a novel application to answering ancient questions.

Allison Stegner will receive the G. Arthur Cooper Award to support her research titled: Assessing small mammal response to Quaternary climate and land use change on the Colorado Plateau.

Barnosky presents statement on global environmental problems to Governor Brown

When California governor Jerry Brown challenged scientists to put global change issues into terms that political leaders can understand UCMP's Tony Barnosky stepped up. On May 23 Barnosky and colleagues presented a 30-page statement entitled Maintaining Humanity’s Life Support Systems in the 21st Century to the governor. It's a strong statement about global environmental problems and what people must do to insure the future health of the planet with signatories from 44 countries including two Nobel laureates, 33 members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and members of other nations' scientific academies.

 

Read more about Barnosky and other scientists' presentation to the governor at the UC Berkeley News Center.

 

Read the scientific consensus statement at the Millenium Alliance for Humanity & the Biosphere website.

Another feather in Judy Scotchmoor's cap

Our very own Judy Scotchmoor, Co-Director of Education and Outreach at the UCMP, received the 2013 Chancellor's Award for Public Service. The award honors outstanding public service by UC Berkeley undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, and staff. The Civic Engagement Award received by Judy is, in part, for her exceptional ability to develop, nurture, and leverage collaborative partnerships and resources to better engage the public with exciting and accessible science.

In a public ceremony held on May 9, 2013, at the Alumni House on campus, Judy’s leadership in the Understanding Evolution and Understanding Science websites was highlighted, as well as her efforts in Science@Cal, COPUS, and KQED Quest. Congratulations, Judy!

Judy with the Chancellor

Judy with Chancellor Birgeneau.

Judy at the podium

Photos courtesy of Bruce Cook Photography.

The Looy Lab paleo detectives: Dori and Cindy at the NMNH

Cissites

A Cissites harkerianus leaf from Ellsworth County, Kansas, collected by Charles Sternberg in the late 1800s, and identified by Leo Lesquereux. Specimen from the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History. (photo by Dori Contreras)

Tuesday morning, February 12, 2013, Dori Contreras and Cindy Looy woke before dawn to catch a cross-country flight to Washington, DC, for a two-week visit to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). Originally, Cindy was going to attend a biannual workshop of the Evolution of Terrestrial Ecosystem Program. However, after Dori obtained a Sigma Xi grant to study a fossil leaf collection housed in the NMNH’s paleobotanical collections, they teamed up and turned it into a joint research excursion filled with an array of activities.

Dori: My main goal was to collect data for a study on the leaf characteristics of early flowering plants from a warm wet climate approximately 100 million years ago. And just to clarify, what I mean by "data" is photographs — lots and lots of high-resolution photographs of individual fossil leaves preserved in rock. The specific fossils that I was interested in come from the Fort Harker locality in Kansas. They were collected over a roughly 30-year period (1860s through 1890s) as a part of the US Geological Survey’s explorations of the geology of the Western Interior of the United States.

I wasn’t exactly sure how many specimens I would find in the museum "stacks," which consist of rows and rows of floor-to-ceiling cabinets filled with drawers of fossils. Based on Leo Lesquereux’s publications from the late 19th century, I was expecting somewhere around 100 specimens. However, after two days of opening wooden drawers I located just over 300 Fort Harker specimens! Many have never been figured or mentioned in publications, and most have not been reevaluated in over 100 years.

Dori with the camera setup

Dori photographing the Cretaceous Fort Harker flora. (photo by Cindy Looy)

I knew that it would be a major task to photograph them all in the detail needed for study, so I went right to work. The museum's imaging room had an impressive setup of top-notch, stand-mounted cameras connected to computers for remote shooting. Most of my time was spent carting specimens back and forth between the stacks and imaging room and doing nonstop photography. The trickiest part of imaging for data collection was getting the lighting angle and brightness just right to pick up the three-dimensional (and often obscure) features of each leaf. At least magnification wasn't an issue — the resolution of the camera I used was so high that a microscope was not necessary!

Inga

Inga cretaceum, another fossil leaf collected by Charles Sternberg and identified by Leo Lesquereux. Specimen from the Department of Paleobiology, National Museum of Natural History. (photo by Dori Contreras)

Ultimately, I was able to photograph almost every specimen in the collection, totaling a whopping 50 gigabytes of images. Now I look forward to the next tasks: naming and organizing all those files, followed by detailed measuring of key ecological leaf characteristics for each specimen. Luckily ,a new Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (URAP) student just joined "Team Contreras." We hope this study will provide insight into the structure and function of plant communities in warm, wet climates during the early radiation of flowering plants.

Cindy: Last year, members of the NMNH's Evolution of Terrestrial Ecosystem Program received good news from NSF: their Research Coordination Network proposal, "Synthesizing deep time and recent community ecology," was funded. This means that over the next five years a group of paleo- and "extant" ecologists will meet semiannually to study the assembly and disassembly of biological communities in the past and present. Attending this winter's edition of our meeting series was my main goal of this museum trip. Our workshop consisted of three days of presentations, data gathering and subsequent analyses in a friendly and inspiring atmosphere.

Workshop attendees

The NMNH’s Evolution of Terrestrial Ecosystems Program workshop attendees. Cindy is ninth from the left. (photo by Dori Contreras)

It is always a treat to return to the NMNH, smack in the middle of the National Mall in DC. From 2004 to 2008 I worked as a research fellow in the Paleobiology Department of this bigger sister of the UCMP and being at the NMNH always instills a special feeling. It could be the 325,000 square feet of exhibition space, the 20,000 daily visitors from all over the globe, or the 126,000,000 documented specimens in the museum's collections. Perhaps it is the illusion of being in the "center of the world," with the close proximity of the NMNH to the White House. But still, I know how lucky I am to be at the west coast equivalent of the NMNH. The UCMP public exhibits may be primarily online, but with the Department of Integrative Biology, the UCMP boasts something that the NMNH lacks altogether and something that presidential fly-bys can never compensate for: a pack of fabulous graduate and undergraduate students!

Outside of the meeting I had plenty of time to catch up with friends and work with former colleagues. Fellow-paleobotanist Bill DiMichele and I spent quite a bit of time in the museum's paleobotany collections. During the past 20 years, Paleozoic paleobotanists from the NMNH (Bill DiMichele, Dan Chaney, and Serge Mamay) have intensively sampled latest Pennsylvanian, Early Permian and Middle Permian sites in Texas. More than 360 collections of compression fossils were assembled using sampling strategies appropriate for the reconstruction of plant communities. Bill and I pulled out numerous conifers for morphotyping. We are trying to get a grip on how diverse early Permian Euramerican forests were, and how seed-plant dominated assemblages changed through time. Working our way through all the cabinets took quite some time, but that's nothing compared to all the imaging and measuring that still needs to be done. Ah well, that’s what is great about being a scientist: the work is never completed. Every question answered raises plenty of new, interesting questions.

Bill and Cindy

Cindy and Bill DiMichele working in the paleobotanical collections. (photo by Dori Contreras)

Both: Additionally, we got to present our work to east coast paleontologists and geologists at the annual Penn-Smithsonian Geobiology Symposium. It's always good to foster cross-talk on the continental scale and represent the paleontological force that is the UCMP!

Cindy and Dori sample pie

If you ever find yourself in DC, we highly recommend breakfast at Paul's French bakery ("Bonjour Madame!"). Here we test some of their pies for Cindy’s birthday. (photo by Bill DiMichele)